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The Arch and Anth Podcast

The Arch and Anth Podcast aims to provides entertaining and educational content about archaeology and anthropology. Hosting the show is me, Dr Michael B. C. Rivera, an expert in the study of human biology, human behavior and human societies worldwide, from the earliest beginnings to modern times (you can read more about me here).

This podcast is aimed at a broad audience. There is no assumption that listeners will already be well-informed about the study of people and what that involves. Through interviews with various guests, the podcast will address a wide enough range of topics for you to find something of interest. All episodes will be designed to be thought-provoking and entertaining for all!

Jun 28, 2019

Katie Faillace calls in from the University of Cardiff to share her work in dental anthropology. By measuring non-metric traits, Katie is able to use archaeological teeth to infer relatedness among different populations across the region of Wessex between the Roman and early medieval periods. This is because dental...


Jun 26, 2019

On this episode, Kimberleigh Tommy (University of the Witwatersrand - Johannesburg) speaks about the evolution of bipedal gait, the cultural variation in how children are taught to walk, and how our skeletons have adapted to two-legged locomotion.

We also address some of the structural issues and biases in academia that...


Jun 24, 2019

In this episode, we have Dr David Petts (University of Durham) joining us on the show. We tackle such topics as the early medieval period in Britain, the emergence of Christianity, and the social processes and religious/cultural interactions occurring across the 1st millennium CE. This summer, he will be in the field...


Jun 21, 2019

Before we close out the week, we have another great episode with University of Toronto bioanthropologist Devin Ward. She studies a tiny skeletal structure called the bony labyrinth located quite deep inside on either side of the skull. By using microCT technologies, accessing archaeological remains and utilising...


Jun 19, 2019

 

Today, we welcome Amanda Rossillo (Duke University, Durham, North Carolina) to speak about her work studying the fossil remains of the hominin Homo naledi using a method of shape analysis called geometric morphometrics. Amanda has also spent time researching the place of Homo heidelbergensis in our evolutionary...